Grammar

IN DEPTH

Tuesday, 17 Dec 2013, by

When a word is hyphenated across lines of text, the break traditionally comes at a syllable boundary. Most dictionaries indicate these breaks with a symbol, usually a boldface, centered bullet (•). This symbol indicates potential break points: some dictionaries show all syllable breaks; others show only those allowed by conventional style standards. (For example, most style guides dictate that a single letter cannot be stranded.)

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I find it ironic that a book about grammar contains "over" instead of "more than" as well as a hyphenated adverb (clearly) in the title! That alone
Anonymous
The Oxford Dictionary of English
That's my typo. Thanks for the heads up!
Dawn McIlvain Stahl
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