Grammar

IN DEPTH

Tuesday, 17 Dec 2013, by
1

When a word is hyphenated across lines of text, the break traditionally comes at a syllable boundary. Most dictionaries indicate these breaks with a symbol, usually a boldface, centered bullet (•). This symbol indicates potential break points: some dictionaries show all syllable breaks; others show only those allowed by conventional style standards. (For example, most style guides dictate that a single letter cannot be stranded.)

GRAMMAR ON THE EDGE

Tuesday, 17 Dec 2013, by

Like many other slightly archaic bits of grammar, the subjunctive mood causes undue consternation. Usage commentators have been decrying the misuse of the subjunctive and mourning its imminent loss for nearly three centuries. Many have predicted that it would vanish within another generation or so, yet it soldiers on.

WORD RESOURCE ROUNDUP

Tuesday, 17 Dec 2013, by
2

Slate, long one of the best online magazines, recently staked its claim as a go-to site for language news and analysis with the blog Lexicon Valley. The word-focused blog features some of the most respected and readable word experts around, such as Mark Liberman, James Harbeck, and Ben Zimmer. It’s become a top online destination for word mavens.

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